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A Reasonably Successful Jazz Chorale

This past week in my jazz arranging class, we started talking about chorale writing. In jazz contexts, a “chorale” is a work of polyphonic music played without the rhythm section. Removing the rhythm section sort of changes the rules of the game; you can’t rely on their persistent improvisation to make up for a lack of rhythmic or harmonic interest in what’s going on elsewhere. As a result, chorale writing is driven by melody, not by groove.

My professor started class on Monday by listing off four basic characteristics to strive towards in jazz chorale writing: independent motion, varied melodic registers, reuse of material from the main theme in the counterlines, and a flexible tempo.

With those basic principles in mind, I went ahead and put together a basic jazz chorale arrangement of Mancini’s The Days of Wine and Roses. Since I’ve been wanting to write something for the U-Tubes (UNT’s jazz trombone ensemble), I opened up a blank score with 8 trombone staves and set to work. Here’s what I came up with:

The Days of Wine and Roses; trombone chorale by Adam Jensen

You can also download the score if you’d prefer to follow along on paper. The arrangement has its problems, but I do think it demonstrates the basic idea pretty well. In fact, I think I’m going to fix it up a bit and then use it as an introduction to a larger chart, which I’ll be writing over the course of the semester. Keep watching for more about that piece!

Music , chorale, jazz, jazz arranging, melody, recordings, trombone

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